Former Pakistan cricketer Abdul Razzaq is again in the news for making sexist remarks on the Pakistan all-rounder Nida Dar which has cost him severe bullies and backlashes on social media, especially the micro-blogging site Twitter. The incident took place on Neo News, during a live telecast where Razzaq shared undignified words about Dar’s appearance.

In a video cut from G Sarkar with NaumanIjaz broadcast June 6 on Neo News, former cricket all-rounder Abdul Razzaq remarked on Dar’s appearance, emphatically suggesting that the cricketer looks more like a man than a lady. The clasp as of late grabbed the eye and rage of social media.

“She aspires to come to the level of the men’s cricket team and believes that men aren’t the only ones who can do everything, women can do these things as well,” Razzaq said and further added, “That’s why the feeling is gone. Shake her hands and you won’t even feel she’s a girl.”

He proceeded to say that women cricketers try to be on a similar level as their male counterparts and surprisingly expressed that Dar’s hands don’t feel like that of a woman. “Their field is as such. When they become cricketers, they strive to be as equal as their male counterparts, if not better than them. They want to prove that not only men but can also do it as well. The feeling (to get married) is gone by the time they excel. If you shake her hands, you won’t even feel she’s a girl,” Razzaq blabbed out on the show.

Razzaq’s remarks are stunning, however, tragically they aren’t something women athletes haven’t heard previously. There are profoundly set negative perspectives towards the assemblages of women athletes from one side of the world to the other however particularly in Pakistan where ladies are policed to look a specific way overall.

Dar bore Razzaq’s remark with a ton of elegance and poise — undeniably more than what anyone would have had in a similar circumstance. She clarified why women cricketers appear to be more ‘hardened’ than other women and also emphasized the kind of rigorous training programs that they are subjected to obey duly.

“Our profession is such that we have to do batting, bowling and every other thing [that the sport requires] which needs fitness, so yes your body does become hard. If I hadn’t been a cricketer, I would have definitely been a [sports] professional of some sort,” said Nida Dar.

In the interview, one of the host comedians likewise kidded about how the cricketer appeared to be hypersensitive and quoted her as “allergic” to the thought of marriage since she didn’t make reference to it. Albeit, Dar had said earlier in the show, “If I hadn’t been a cricketer, I would have definitely been a (sports) professional of some sort.”

This isn’t the first run-through that the male cricketers have offered chauvinist comments. In 2017, cricketer and former coach Waqar Younis was called out for ‘suggesting’ on Twitter that the Women’s World Cup matches ought to have just 30 overs as the standard 50 were “a few too many”.

In 2019, cricketer Shahid Afridi met with analysis after he conceded in his autobiography came to Changer’ that he will not allow his girls to play outdoor sports. “It’s for social and religious reasons that I’ve made this decision regarding my daughters not competing in public sporting activities and their mother agrees with me,” he wrote in his book.

Here is how Twitterati reacted to Abdul Razzaq and Nida Dar incident:

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